Olympics 2012 vs West Indies Cricket


The video is blocked from this website by the IOC and the song is called Survival and sung by British rock band Muse. I hear this song nearly every day and probably even on our local Star 94.7 and still can’t picture it as a theme song for the Olympics.

On the other hand, the song below is a West Indies Cricket song which has enough energy to power the 2012 Olympics in London for all its days. The song is called We Are The West Indies and its performed by Tian Wynter & Keida.

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Digicel Girls


Digicel Girl - Trinidad and Tobago 2011

Digicel Girl - Trinidad and Tobago 2011

The Digicel Girls are as popular in Trinidad and Tobago, or even more popular than their island-wide coverage and superior ability to hold a call instead of dropping it like the other provider does so well. With Digicel being a sponsor of the West Indies Cricket team, the Trinidad and Tobago Digicel Girls make appearances at all the internationally televised matches featuring the West Indies and are now the only reason to look at a cricket match featuring the West Indies.

I took some photos of the Digicel Girls during the Carnival season using a point-and-shoot camera I grabbed from a nearby person just to preserve an important part of our local culture. I had to set the camera on voyeur-mode to take these photos so as not to be restrained earlier.

The video below was made with the point-and-shoot camera and it is a clip lasting a few seconds repeated over and over and over just to irritate.

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Ernest Hilaire, CEO of WICB on the state of West Indies Cricket


The WICB CEO Ernest Hilaire © West Indies Cricket Board

I thought this was one of the best assessments of the state of West Indies Cricket which was given by  Ernest Hilaire, the CEO of the WICB. His comments explains, in my view, why it is idiotic to say “we have the talent” because we really don’t. As I may have said before, talent is not just in physical ability but also in one’s sense of purpose, determination and attitude. That is why when we see a West Indian cricketer on the field sporting that bling coupled with misplaced ego, wearing that maroon West Indian uniform fans and supporters now feel a sense of shame and almost no pride inside. He did say it was going to get worse before it gets better – that has a familiar and scary ring to it – but given the current state of the Caribbean society, I think it can only get better when children are taken straight from the crib and placed into the the High Performance Centre Mr. Hilaire speaks about in the article in the Stabroker News – maybe, just maybe, I am being too drastic.  I hope WIPA is not offended by the truth but being offended seems to be one of the goals of WIPA. Here is a quote from that article:-

Hilaire said the players seem devoid of the pride that drove previous successful West Indies teams.

“I listen to our players speak, and they speak of money, that’s all that matters to them – instant gratification,” he said.

“There’s no sense of investing in the future coming from them. We are producing young people in the region that we expect, when they play cricket for the West Indies, to be paragons of virtue. That just won’t happen.”

He said: “Sometimes when you speak to the players, you feel a sense of emptiness. The whole notion of being a West Indian, and for what they are playing has no meaning at all.

“They have not been brought up with a clear understanding of what it means, and its importance. But do we blame them?”

Hilaire conceded this was a sad reflection on wider societal ills in the Caribbean.

“This is what we have produced as a region,” he said. “We as a region have some real issues and problems that are producing young men in particular, that cannot dream of excellence. “Excellence for them is about the bling, and the money they have.

“Our cricketers are products of the failure of our Caribbean society, where money and instant gratification are paramount.”

Hilaire doesn’t feel confident about the young West Indies cricketers in waiting, questioning the literacy of half the Under-19 team that finished third in the Youth World Cup in New Zealand earlier this year.

He said: “I keep hearing from people, ‘Fire those [current] guys, and bring in new ones!’, but where is the new set coming from? Who are we going to bring in?”

“Somebody said to me, ‘Bring in the Under-19s. They came third at the Youth World Cup’. And I whispered that almost half of the Under-19 team could barely read or write.

“The simple fact is that we are producing cricketers who are not capable of being World-beaters in cricket. It’s just a simple fact.”

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Sex and West Indies Cricket


It would seem that every West Indian batsman wants to be a hero and end up on the back page of Caribbean daily newspapers for their heroic batting deeds the day before. They do this because in the Caribbean, if you are perceived as a good West Indian cricketer, especially a batsman, you will get plenty woman. Some West Indian men get women with charm and a check book while others get women by appointing them as Government Ministers. But West Indian cricketers feel in order to get the best shaped women with firm bodies and looks that would kill even after these women have just woken up from a night of partying and group sex, batsmen have to score sixes and fours at the international level, regardless of the pitch and bowling. If you are a bowler, you have to take scores of wickets but batsmen are considered sexier than bowlers because a man swinging a good size piece of willow is sexier than a man throwing  a ball at stumps.

This egoistic sexual urge by the West Indies batsmen has been the downfall of West Indies cricket over the years. The average West Indian batsman makes easy things hard because they let their urge for sex override the common sense lobe of their brain and therefore they get out quickly and by their own hand. It is known as an unforced error. Some say it is the lack of discipline by West Indian cricketers and I suppose discipline can be considered the ability to dampen ones sexual urges while batting.

Some say the West Indies have the talent to beat any team but I disagree. To me talent is having skilful brains and a desire to win. So far, and for a number of years, most West Indies cricketers have displayed almost none of the attributes of talent so how can we beat any team.  Maybe we in the West Indies just don’t have cricket talent anymore but the public have failed to admit this. For West Indies cricketers with and without talent, cricket is a job not a passion. Talent and passion for the game of cricket beats ego and sexual desires any day.

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The Fed Up 69% – Trinidad and Tobago


As is normal with international gatherings of world leaders and hot air, a group who knows Trinidad and Tobago better than any foreign or local politician has taken out a full-page ad to alert leaders about impostors amongst their midst. Impostors who scarcely understand the game of cricket despite living in the West Indies for too long. I am not fed up as I am numb. I don’t blame the government for their arrogance towards citizens because arrogance is a byproduct of ignorance and stupidity, not the cause. Politicians are part of society – not the best part though – and have evolved into what they are today because they were misguided into thinking they have the divine right to do as they please, as if Trinidad and Tobago was not a democracy.  We have a leader, when armed with two lines of data, thinks he has volumes of knowledge but what he really has is a misunderstanding of public sentiment and a most compliant police service who will protect and serve only one master.

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If You Can’t Beat Them, Shoot Them – The Public Cries


Johnny-abrahams-cops-kills-3Cops Kill 3 Kidnappers appeared to be the best news the crime-battered Trinidad and Tobago public had since hearing their cricket team made it to the 20Twenty finals in India.

From the stories all three newspapers carried, a businessman from Champs Fleur was kidnapped yesterday morning. The police were alerted and soon found the kidnappers’ car and gave chase. According to the newspapers, it was a high speed chase and not a low speed one. The kidnappers, realizing these police officers were heavily armed and not easy, decided to abandon their victim and ran through some bushes to escape fate and possibly some good licks. The kidnappers – young men from Beverly Hills- had guns and concluded, like any good criminal would, that they cannot escape without shooting at the police. Little did these kidnappers know that this team of police officers was being led by ASP Johnny Abraham, a colorful character and a no-nonsense police officer. As the saying goes, a team is as good as its leader so the bandits, lacking leadership and bulletproof vests, succumbed to the several bullet holes they received from Abraham’s team. One kidnapper escaped and I feel it’s only a matter of time before he meets his bullet. I am not saying it is right but I am saying it will happen.

On the heels of this kidnapping and CHOGM, but probably not because of it, a strengthening of the Police Service was announced today by Minister Martin Joseph but not many people noticed or cared.

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Trinidad and Tobago vs NSW – CLT20 Finals Poll


Trinidad and Tobago beat Cape Cobras today and secured a place in the CLT20 finals tomorrow. Vote now.

Trinidad and Tobago became the favorite among the cricketing world and they moved from underdog at the start of the competition, to top dog today. The winner of the finals will take home $US2.4 million. The losers would hardly be considered losers and take home $US1.4 million. Not a bad dollar-haul considering Sir Allen Stanford is broke and beaten up in a US jail. The money is good but not as important as the example the Trinidad and Tobago team has set for West Indies Cricket.

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